Powershell Modify User Rights Assignment Policies

Verified on the following platforms
Windows 10 No
Windows Server 2012 No
Windows Server 2012 R2 No
Windows Server 2008 R2 Yes
Windows Server 2008 No
Windows Server 2003 No
Windows 8 No
Windows 7 No
Windows Vista No
Windows XP No
Windows 2000 No

This script is tested on these platforms by the author. It is likely to work on other platforms as well. If you try it and find that it works on another platform, please add a note to the script discussion to let others know.

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User Rights Assignment

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Applies to

Provides an overview and links to information about the User Rights Assignment security policy settings user rights that are available in Windows. User rights govern the methods by which a user can log on to a system. User rights are applied at the local device level, and they allow users to perform tasks on a device or in a domain. User rights include logon rights and permissions. Logon rights control who is authorized to log on to a device and how they can log on. User rights permissions control access to computer and domain resources, and they can override permissions that have been set on specific objects. User rights are managed in Group Policy under the User Rights Assignment item.

Each user right has a constant name and a Group Policy name associated with it. The constant names are used when referring to the user right in log events. You can configure the user rights assignment settings in the following location within the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) under Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Local Policies\User Rights Assignment, or on the local device by using the Local Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc).

For information about setting security policies, see Configure security policy settings.

The following table links to each security policy setting and provides the constant name for each. Setting descriptions contain reference information, best practices for configuring the policy setting, default values, differences between operating system versions, and considerations for policy management and security.

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